Important Information Regarding COVID-19.

Colon Cancer in Young Patients

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) — There’s good news and bad news in the war against colon cancer: While rates have fallen among older Americans, cases among adults aged 20 to 49 are rising and expected to continue to do so, a new study finds.

The study also predicts that by 2020 and 2030, colon cancer rates are expected to jump by about 38 percent and 90 percent, respectively, among people aged 20 to 34, but fall by about 23 percent and 41 percent, respectively, among people older than 50.

The findings are published online Nov. 5 in the journal JAMA Surgery.

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